Opthamologists and opometrists

Opthamologist News

Welcome to the Opthamologist News page (Ophthalmologist News ).

This page is intended as a quick update on whats going on in the world of Opthamology, including ophthalmology studies, news and general articles. Have a browse and see if something catches your eye.

We have also added another  Opthalmology news page, that includes only the latest medical studies and results, so if you are an Opthamologist, then it is also worth a read: Ophthalmology Journal.

For our ‘General Eye Health’ news page, please see: Eye Health.

Enjoy reading.

Opthamologist News:

A corneal inlay awaiting FDA approval would mean people who have good distance vision, but need glasses for up-close reading, wouldn't have to keep taking glasses on and off. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Ophthalmology Headlines)

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Posted: October 25, 2014, 1:24 am
Non-invasive oral QLT091001 therapy is well tolerated, and can rapidly improve visual function in some patients with Leber congenital amaurosis and RPE65 and LRAT mutations. (Source: LANCET)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 11:00 pm
Abstract The current understanding of what infants see varies greatly among healthcare and education specialists. Even among ophthalmologists and pediatric neurologists in charge of clinical examinations of infants, opinions vary on what infants perceive, recognize, and use for communication and learning. It is, therefore, of interest to review publications from several specialties to learn whether new information is available on the development of visual functions and use of vision. Ten percent of total publications on this subject are reviewed here based on the usefulness of their content for improving early diagnosis and intervention of vision disorders in infants. (Source: Current Ophthalmology Reports)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 11:00 pm
Abstract These two studies assessed technology-aided programs for fostering sustained occupational engagement and mobility in persons with multiple disabilities who typically failed to move through sequences of activities. Study I involved two participants with severe intellectual disability and blindness. The program ensured automatic presentation of (a) auditory cues to guide the participants to different workstations with activities, and (b) musical and social (reinforcing) stimulation at the participants’ arrival at each of the workstations. Study II involved one participant with severe to profound intellectual disability and moderate hearing impairment. The program presented combinations of auditory and visual cues to guide the participant to the workstations and positive ...

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Posted: October 24, 2014, 7:31 pm
Compared to probe-tuned optomechanical cavity systems, coupled cavity systems have the merit of having much stronger optomechanical interactions. However, to date, the torsional optomechanical effects of coupled cavities have rarely been investigated. In this Letter, we report a torsional optical ... (Source: Optics Letters)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 3:52 pm
To calculate the keratometric (K) reading in corneas modified by myopic keratorefractive surgery using the total corneal refractive power (TCRP) of the Pentacam rotating Scheimpflug camera. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:01 am
To determine the effect of histones on corneal endothelial cells generated during cataract surgery. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:01 am
Three methods are currently used for posterior polar cataract surgery: intracapsular cataract extraction, posterior approach, and anterior approach. A high level of skill is required to divide the lens in the anterior approach, and few studies have investigated safer or simpler division methods. We focused on the division method in posterior polar cataract and developed a pre-surround division technique that divides the nucleus and avoids the posterior opacity. This technique creates precise cracks that surround the posterior opacity prior to phacoemulsification and does not cause intraoperative complications, resulting in successful intraocular lens implantation in all eyes. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:01 am
To redefine measures of corneal coupling for use with incisional and ablation procedures for astigmatism. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)

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Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:01 am
An 80-year-old man sustained blunt contusional trauma to the right eye when he was manipulating a war explosive at the age of 12 years. He immediately lost vision in this eye. Vision partly recovered during the following months and deteriorated again to perception of light and hand movements. More recently, the patient has been increasingly bothered by photophobia. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:01 am
I would begin by staining the vitreous with dilute triamcinolone. I would first attempt to push back the prolapsed vitreous with a cohesive ophthalmic viscosurgical device (OVD). If this were unsuccessful, I would proceed with a limited anterior vitrectomy. The zonular gap is large enough that one could direct the vitrector through the defect, making sure to be posterior to the lens equator to pull the vitreous from the anterior chamber. However, I would favor a pars plana approach, taking only enough to remove the vitreous from the anterior chamber. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:01 am
Before proceeding with surgical rehabilitation of this eye, the patient should be warned of the possibility of limited visual recovery, diplopia, and persistent photophobia as a result of removal of this dense cataract and restoration of vision. The patient and surgeon will be most comfortable with surgery performed under a peribulbar or retrobulbar block. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:01 am
This patient has a dense brunescent cataract and an iridodialysis. Cataract surgery seems appropriate given the complaint of increasing photophobia and the findings shown in the photographs. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)

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Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:01 am
Treating this very challenging case should include reducing the photophobia with iridodialysis repair and restoring good visual acuity. It seems possible to safely manage the eye through a modern small-incision surgery approach. The crystalline lens can be managed by a small-incision technique considering the arc length of the zonular defect. Depending on the surgical findings, the capsular bag might have to be fixated to the scleral wall using a modified CTR or CTS with fixation elements to the scleral wall. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:00 am
This patient presents with 2 major problems; that is, photophobia and poor visual acuity in an eye that sustained blunt trauma in his late childhood. Due to good vision in his early childhood and the normal retinal and macular appearance, the potential for visual acuity restoration is good. Comparison of the axial length (AL) between the eyes will add another clue regarding the visual potential of the eye. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:00 am
This case in which the patient’s main complaint is photophobia in the right eye requires consideration of several issues; that is, the hard cataract, temporal iridodialysis, and zonular dehiscence with localized vitreous prolapse. It seems as though the lens is not wobbling, and the normal ECC is reassuring. The first question is whether and how to extract the dense cataract considering that the pupil does not dilate well and there is vitreous prolapse. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:00 am
The patient’s eye was injured at the age of 12 years, which means the eye might have become amblyopic. Furthermore, the patient might have lost stereopsis. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)

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Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:00 am
The patient’s main problem is increasing photophobia caused by the secondary extension of the zonular coloboma due to progressive shrinkage of the lens. The accident occurred at the age of 12 years, when binocular vision was already fully developed and the retina and macula look normal. Therefore, the chance of inducing binocular double vision because of postoperative exotropia or fusion problems is acceptably low. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:00 am
With this dense hard nucleus and other abnormalities due to trauma, phacoemulsification may be difficult and dangerous. A better option might be manual small-incision cataract surgery using the fishhook technique.A,B This technique was developed at Lahan Eye Hospital in Nepal in 1997 and is widely used in Nepal and other parts of the world. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:00 am
We describe a technique for sutureless intrascleral fixation of a 3-piece intraocular lens (IOL) and custom silicone iris prosthesis complex to address the optical and functional issues of aphakia and aniridia, as well as to restore excellent cosmesis. The 3-piece IOL is anchored to the iris prosthesis using the belt-loop technique. We believe the intrascleral haptic fixation is overall a more robust fixation method in patients with aphakia and aniridia, who are often younger and require a long-lasting anterior segment reconstruction. (Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery)
Posted: October 24, 2014, 8:00 am

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